Studio Practice

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TDF 102 Studio Practice 1: Fundamental Skills. Drawing and Hand embroidery. Lecturer Lyndsey McDougall.
  • forlikeminded:

Jenny Packham - New York Fashion Week - Spring 2015

    forlikeminded:

    Jenny Packham - New York Fashion Week - Spring 2015

    (via spastiqueboutique)

  • naimabarcelona:

Marchesa Spring 2015 - runway -LFW

    naimabarcelona:

    Marchesa Spring 2015 - runway -LFW

    (Source: Vogue, via maced0)

  • missannavaldez:

new work! 
"References"
oil on canvas. 80 x 70 inches. 2014

    missannavaldez:

    new work! 

    "References"

    oil on canvas. 80 x 70 inches. 2014

    (via maced0)

  • mulberry-cookies:

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015(Details)

    mulberry-cookies:

    Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015(Details)

    (via maced0)

  • skt4ng:

J.W. Anderson Spring / Summer 2015

    skt4ng:

    J.W. Anderson Spring / Summer 2015

    (via maced0)

  • tihdal:

fresh x modern blog | checking out all new followers who send me a ‘' | new ig (_bonniew)

    tihdal:

    fresh x modern blog | checking out all new followers who send me a ‘' | new ig (_bonniew)

    (Source: i-wanna-be-your-illusion, via maced0)

  • stopdropandvogue:

    We always associate mermaids with splashing around in the summer sun. Yet in late March under that melting layer of the ocean’s ice exists a magical world. Slumbering at the bottom of the ocean are the Rodarte mermaids, waiting for the ice to melt so they can take a peak at the turn of seasons. For their Spring/Summer 2015 collection Kate and Laura Mulleavy recreated scenes of their adolescent lullabies and their coastal childhoods memories of wading in tide pools on the coast of California while waving at mermaids in the distant sea.

    Using fish scale embellishments and fishhook piercings, Rodarte created a collection that could easily be substituted for costumes in Pirates of the Caribbean 5 (what I consider of the Star Wars of our generation) or Sofia Coppola’s take on The Little Mermaid. The icy-mermaid dresses complimented the pirate thigh-high lace-up boots, hook belts and ruffles, creating an action-packed fantasy of seduction, shipwreck and mystery.

    Swaying like seaweed, the clothing looked like it was gracefully being pulled back and forth by the rolling tide. The aquatic-themed silhouettes were as dainty as sea foam. The color pallet consisted of navy, white, icy blue, murky green and nacre - the iridescent tint of inside a seashell. The delicate hem of the mermaid dresses looked like sea anemones. Urchins and anomiidae, better known as mermaid’s toenails, decorated the upper half of the garments.

    "We wanted to re-create the texture of those underwater tide pools, to explore this idea of underwater worlds, with all the movement and fluidity,” the Mulleavy sisters explained (Vogue). The whirlpool atmosphere of the set was confirmed by the piles of shimmery sea glass, which many attendees took as a keepsake. One can never go wrong with an underwater fashion theme - seeing as the Rodarte sisters are always known to take an otherworldly idea and execute it to perfection.

    Photos by Lea Colombo, Kevin Tachman and Barbara Anastacio. Written by Taylor Aube

    (via acceptable)

  • hnnhmcgrth:

    The Traditional Costumes of Peasant Women in Germany and Alsace

    Traditional costumes have virtually disappeared, but until the 1950s, this kind of attire was very common across Europe. From the color and cut you could conclude whether a woman was married, how old she was, which family she came from, and how wealthy they were.

    In 2008, Eric Schütt started looking for women who still wear traditional clothes for his photography project called Burenkleider: Burska Drasta, or Traditional Costumes of Peasant Women in Germany and Alsace. The women in these photos are never seen without their traditional costumes. They wear their costumes in the house and outside. In many cases, they are the last ones in their village wearing the clothes with their original purpose, and the other villagers look at them like as if they’re flamboyant, exotic birds. Some of these women have died by now—Eric’s photographs are the last document of this disappearing phenomenon.

    (via blackspider)

  • (Source: kitoumi, via pale-0rgasm)

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